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Officers & Council of the
Systematics Association (2017)

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Officers




President (2015-2018)
Dr. Mark Wilkinson
Department of Life Sciences
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Rd
London SW7 5BD
Mark Wilkinson Mark is a Researcher at the Natural History Museum, London focussing on systematics and evolution. Mark combines field and lab-based empirical work on caecilians (mainly tropical, snake-like amphibians) with more theoretical work in phylogenetics including issues in character construction, effects of missing data, and the development and evaluation of consensus and supertree methods.
Secretary
Dr. Eve Lucas (2015-2018)
Comparative Plant and Fungal Biology
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Richmond
Surrey TW9 3AB
Eve Lucas Eve studies the taxonomy, systematics, biogeography and conservation of the guava family (Myrtaceae), with a focus on the predominantly Neotropical tribe Myrteae and the genus Myrcia s.l. She has interests also in Neotropical ecology and other Myrtaceae with fleshy fruits. Eve curates the Myrtales collection in the Kew herbarium, sits on the editorial boards of the Flora of the Guianas and Kew Bulletin and is an editor of Phytotaxa. Eve lectures on the Kew tropical id course and likes nothing more than Neotropical field work.
Young Systematists' Forum leader
Dr. Ellinor Michel (2016-)
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Rd
London SW7 5BD
Elinor Michel Ellinor works on diversification in species flocks, with a focus on molluscan taxonomy, systematics and ecology in African fresh waters, especially the Great Rift Lakes. She also has an interest in biodiversity informatics, nomenclature and the use of scientific collections in climate change research. She is based at the Natural History Museum, London.
Meetings Secretary
Dr. Alex Monro (2009-)
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Richmond
Surrey TW9 3AB
Alex Monro Alex is a plant taxonomist at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. His research aims to generate and document biological diversity data and collections and to use these to establish and test hypotheses of relationships between taxa or areas. In doing so, he aims to help meet civil society's demands on taxonomy as articulated in the Convention on Biological Diversity, its work programme and cross-cutting issues. Foci for this are the plant family Urticaceae (nettles), the Neotropics, karst and SW China. Links to online CV: Read CV Link to blog: Read Blog
Grants & Awards Secretary for SRF
Dr. Anne D. Jungblut (2016-)
Dept. of Life Sciences
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Rd
London SW7 5BD
Anne D. Jungblut Anne is a researcher at the Natural History Museum, London. Her research interests are in the diversity and biogeography of microbial communities in freshwater and soil ecosystems. Particular focus is on bloom-forming cyanobacteria, microbial mats in Arctic and Antarctic freshwaters, and the phylogenetics and evolution of polar cyanobacteria.
Membership Secretary
Dr. Jon Bennett (2007-)
St Pauls School
Lonsdale Road
London SW13 9JT
Jon Bennett Jon is currently a member of the biology department at St. Paul's School, London (www.stpaulsschool.org.uk). Before moving into teaching he worked as a post-doc on various research projects including a worldwide monograph of the large genus Solanum (www.nhm.ac.uk/solanaceaesource) at the Natural History Museum, London and an investigation of the evolution of photoreceptors in the parasitic plant family Orobanchaceae in the lab of Dr Sarah Mathews, Harvard University. His interest in the systematics of the Lamiales began during his PhD studies on the taxonomy of Strobilanthes (Acanthaceae) in Oxford; Jon still retains an interest in the taxonomy of Acanthaceae.
Treasurer
Dr. Andrew Briscoe (2016-)
Dept. of Life Sciences
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Rd
London SW7 5BD
Andrew Briscoe
Editor in Chief
Dr. David Gower (2010-)
Dept. of Life Sciences
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Rd
London SW7 5BD
David Gower David is a collections-based vertebrate biologist working on the natural history of amphibians and reptiles. Much of his work is taxonomic and phylogenetic, for which he draws on a wide range of evidence (morphology, molecules, fossils). Current focal taxa are caecilian amphibians, burrowing and aquatic snakes, and Triassic archosaurian reptiles.
Student Representatives
Tom Carruthers (2016-19)
University of Oxford tom.carruthers@wolfson.ox.ac.uk
Tom Carruthers Tom is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. He is interested in plant systematics, biogeography and evolution. He is currently working on the diversification of Ipomoea (Convolvulaceae) in the Neotropics.
Surabhi Ranavat (2016-19)
University of Edinburgh
subu_92@msn.com
Persons Name Surabhi completed her Bachelors and Masters in Biology from Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal (IISER-B) in 2015. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Evolutionary Biology at the University of Edinburgh (UoE) and Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE) supervised by Dr. Alex Twyford (UoE), Dr. Mark Newman (RBGE) and Dr. Vinita Gowda (IISER-B). Her research is based on the genetics of flexistyly in Indian Alpinia species (Zingiberaceae).
Webmaster
Dr. Barbara Mackinder (2015-18)
Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh
20A Inverleith Row
Edinburgh
EH3 5LR
b.mackinder@rbge.ac.uk
Barbara Mackinder Barbara works for the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh. She studies the systematics, evolution and conservation of Tropical African and Arabian Legumes and of Tropical African Sapotaceae (The Miracle Berry family).

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Council members

- terms run for three years commencing at the AGM where council members nomination* is approved. Council can also co-opt members between annual general meetings.

Dr. Xavier Aubriot (2014-17)
Dept. of Life Sciences
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Rd
London SW7 5BD
Xavier Aubriot Xavier is a plant biologist based at the Natural History Museum in London. His research interests are the taxonomy, phylogenetics and diversification of the spiny solanums (Solanaceae) of Tropical Asia. Xavier completed his PhD at Paris Natural History Museum in 2012 and where he became passionate about plants' evolution in the incredibly species rich island of Madagascar. He still working on the diversification of the mega-diverse genus Euphorbia (Euphorbiaceae) in Madagascar.
Dr. Gavin Broad
Dept. of Life Science
LS Insects Division
The Natural History Museum
London SW7 5BD
g.broad@nhm.ac.uk
Gavin Broade
James Clarkson (2016-19)
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Richmond
Surrey TW9 3AB
j.clarkson@kew.org
James Clarkson James works in the Kew Conservation Genetics group utilising genetic and genomic datasets to inform conservation projects. The population level research projects can be divided into two main geographical groups and they are 1) UK overseas territories 2) UK based projects in collaboration with Dr Mike Fay. These activities use microsatellite markers and RADseq (restriction site associated DNA markers) to elucidate population structure. James also has interests in phylogenetic relationships in Guarea (Meliaceae) and in polyploidy in Nicotiana (Solanaceae).
Roger Close (2016-19)
School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences
University of Birmingham
Birmingham B15 2TT
roger.close@gmail.com
Roger Close Roger is an ERC Research Fellow in the School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Birmingham, and a Visiting Fellow at the University of Oxford. He received his Bachelor of Arts/Science (Hons) and PhD from Monash University in Victoria, Australia. Roger has research interests in the systematics of a diverse range of animal groups, including Mesozoic mammals, birds, and acanthomorph fishes. However, his principal research focus is on elucidating large-scale macroevolutionary and macroecological patterns, and he is currently using the Paleobiology Data Base to address key questions about the diversification of tetrapods during the Phanerozoic
Steven Dodsworth (2016-19)
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Richmond
Surrey TW9 3AB
s.dodsworth@kew.org
Steven Dodsworth Steven is an evolutionary botanist with a strong interest in systematics, particularly in the integration of high-throughput sequencing methods into molecular systematics. He works on a variety of angiosperm groups, with a particular interest in the Solanaceae, the evolutionary dynamics of polyploidy, and the genetic bases for floral diversification. Steven is currently a Senior Researcher at Kew, and also an Associate Editor of Systematics and Biodiversity, the NHM journal.
Dr. Greg Edgecombe (2014-17)
Dept. of Life Sciences
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Rd
London SW7 5BD
Greg Edgecombe Greg is a Merit Researcher at the Natural History Museum (London), where he has worked since 2007. Previously he was Principal Research Scientist at the Australian Museum in Sydney, where he was employed from 1993 to 2007. His research involves the deep evolutionary relationships of arthropods, the pattern and timing of animal diversification during the Cambrian explosion, morphology and systematics of Palaeozoic arthropods known from exceptional preservation, and the systematics of centipedes (Chilopoda), drawing on integration of anatomical and molecular datasets.
Dr. Wolf Eiserhardt (2015-)
Comparative Plant and Fungal Biology
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Richmond
Surrey TW9 3AB
w.eiserhardt@kew.org
Wolf Eiserhardt Wolf is a plant systematist at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. While his favourite study group are the palms (Arecaceae), he works on a range of taxa using phylogenomics approaches. He is interested both in species-level phylogenetics of specific groups and higher-level relationships across plants. He also has a strong interest in plant ecology and biogeography, and bringing phylogenetic data to bear on questions of those disciplines. Thus, he is keen to promote a better integration of systematics with its sister disciplines within biodiversity science.
Dr. Laura Forrest (2016-19)
Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh
20A, Inverleith Row
EH3 5LR,UK
lauralforrest@gmail.com
Laura Forrest Laura provides technical support in the molecular laboratory as part of the Scientific and Technical Services (STS) team. This includes providing training and practical support for staff and visitors, and for undergraduate, masters and PhD students, as well as involvement in the day-to-day running of the laboratories.
Beulah Garner (2016-19)
Dept. of Life Sciences
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Rd
London SW7 5BD
b.garner@nhm.ac.uk
Beulah Garner Beulah is a senior curator of Coleoptera at the Natural History Museum, London. She has curatorial responsibility for the Carabidae, Cleroidea, Myxophaga and Archostemata as well as the Coleoptera larval collection. She is an experienced fieldworker focussed on developing the NHM collection of Neotropical Coleoptera. Her research interests also are focussed in the Neotropics in particular the systematics and evolution of the subfamily Lebiinae, a hyperdiverse group of predatory ground beetles.
Prof. Beverley Glover (2014-17)
Cambridge
Beverley Glover Beverley is Professor of Plant Systematics and Evolution, and Director of the Cambridge University Botanic Garden. Her area of interest is the evolution and development of floral traits that are important in attracting animal pollinators. By understanding how plants build traits that attract particular animals she aims to understand the diversification of the flowering plants. She uses a combination of molecular genetic, systematic and developmental techniques to address these problems.
Zoe Goodwin (2015-18)
Dept. of Plant Sciences
Oxford University
South Parks Rd
Oxford OX1 3RB
zoe.goodwin@plants.ox.ac.uk
Zoe Goodwin Zoë is currently studying for a DPhil at the University of Oxford. She is interested in tropical plant taxonomy, diversity and conservation.
Dr. David Goyder
Dept. of Identification and Naming
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Richmond
Surrey TW9 3AB
d.goyder@kew.org.uk
David Goyder
Dr. Olwen Grace (2014-17)
Kew
Olwen Grace Olwen is a researcher at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, where her research programme focuses on the evolution and diversity of succulent plants and desert floras. Olwen is interested in the use of plant systematics to enhance decision making around priorities for research or conservation attention, and emerging tools for phylogenetic prediction. She has a particular interest in the iconic African genus Aloe (Xanthorrhoeaceae).
Yvette Harvey (2016-19)
Royal Horticultural Society Garden Wisley
Woking
Surrey, GU23 6QB
yvetteharvey@rhs.org.uk
Yvette Harvey Tivvy is a plant taxonomist based at the herbarium of the Royal Horticultural Society where she has worked since 2015. Previously a researcher at RBG Kew studying the systematics of African Lamiaceae and the West/Central African flora. Although her current role as Keeper of the Herbarium is more that of collections management, her research continues to focus on the flora of Cameroon
Dr. Zerina Johanson (2014-17)
Dept. of Life Sciences
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Rd
London SW7 5BD
Zerina Johanson
Prof. David Kipling (2014-17)
University of Cardiff
kiplingd@cardiff.ac.uk
David Kipling Here, David is in action in the Isles of Scilly with a football sea squirt (Diazona violacea) to the right, one of the UK’s more dramatic ascidians.
Lorna MacKinnon(2016-19)
Eden Project
Bodelva LINE
Cornwall PL24 2SG
lmackinnon@EdenProject.com
Lorna Mackinnon Lorna is the Plant Records Officer for the Eden Project, a new role which she took up in August of 2016. Previously a Floristic Researcher with the Centre for Middle Eastern Plants at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, she undertook taxonomic revisions of several families of Monocots for the Flora of the Arabian Peninsula and Socotra. As well as herbarium-based taxonomy Lorna has been involved in numerous field projects, including the 2015 expedition to Henderson Island and seed collection for Oman Botanic Garden.
Dr. Ross Mounce (2013-2016)
Academic Researcher
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Rd
London SW7 5BD
Ross Mounce After gaining his BSc in Biology from Imperial College London, Ross then went on to the Natural History Museum 'Advanced Methods in Taxonomy & Biodiversity' MSc course, where he gained a fine appreciation for cladistics. He completed his PhD thesis at the University of Bath investigating the importance of fossils in phylogeny. Ross takes a keen interest in communicating science via social media, as well as the Panton Principles for Open Data in Science with which he hopes to encourage everyone to share publication data more openly and in a more reusable way. http://about.me/rossmounce
Pablo Muñoz-Rodríguez (2015-18)
Dept. of Plant Sciences
Oxford University
South Parks Rd
Oxford OX1 3RB
pablo.munoz@plants.ox.ac.uk
Pablo Munoz-Rodriguez.png Pablo is a botanist working on the systematics of tropical plants. He is currently studying a group of species within the family Convolvulaceae, and has previously worked on the systematics of Euphorbiaceae in South America. He also has an interest in biodiversity conservation and in data management and the promotion of open access in science, and has worked in several projects in connection with GBIF and the Convention on Biological Diversity
Dr. Andrew Polaszek (2015-18)
Dept. of Life Sciences
LS Insects Division
The Natural History Museum
London SW7 5BD
a.polaszek@nhm.ac.uk
Andrew Polaszek
Ranee Prakash (2016-19)
Dept. of Life Sciences
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Rd
London SW7 5BD
r.prakash@nhm.ac.uk
Ranee Om Prakash.jp Ranee is Curator of Flowering Plants –General Herbarium at the Natural History Museum, London. She also looks after the Sloane Herbarium. She has a Masters in Science from India. Ranee has research interests in herbarium and collections management. Her main research is focussed on Ethnobotany, medicinal plants, cross- cultural studies of medicinal plant uses amongst the various tribal groups and tropical plant families.
Dinarzarde Raheem (2016-19)
Dept. of Life Sciences
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Rd
London SW7 5BD
d.raheem@nhm.ac.uk
Dinarzarde Raheem Dinarzarde is a Scientific Associate of the Natural History Museum, London. Dinarzarde's research focuses on the systematics, evolution and ecology of tropical Asian land snails. Ongoing research involves projects in revisionary taxonomy (including comparative anatomy), molecular systematics, palaeontology and community ecology.
Dr. Karen Siu-Ting (2016-19)
University of Aberystwyth
Penglais
Aberystwyth
Ceredigion SY23 3FL
agalychnica@gmail.com
Karen Siu-Ting Karen is a Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellow working at the University of Aberystwyth and Leeds University. Her work combines field work, molecular biology, genomics and bioinformatics. She is a Peruvian herpetologist with extensive experience of barcoding techniques for assessing cryptic amphibian species, discovering novel species and analysing the diversity and conservation status of Peruvian amphibians and reptiles. Her PhD studies, conducted in Ireland, addressed methodological approaches to large-scale phylogenetic reconstructions. Her current postdoctoral work investigates the molecular basis behind the ability of poison arrow frogs to sequester toxins from their diet at the molecular level using transcriptomic and phylogenomic approaches
Dr. Catherine Walton (2014-17)
Manchester
Catherine Walton

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